Change, Technology & Boiled Frogs

Are you familiar with the infamous “frog in a boiling pot” scenario?  If not, click here and read about it for a few seconds, so that you’ll understand what I mean when I say that I’m really starting to feel like a slow-boiled frog when it comes to technology.  The tech world is advancing on so many incredible fronts, all around us, and yet most of these changes happen gradually enough to slip by almost unnoticed.  In a year’s time, people won’t even remember what television was like without a high-definition picture.  Or how we got along without texting or tweeting each other.  Or how we screened our calls before the Caller ID information was transmitted directly onto the screen of our television sets — which just started happening at the Youngquist household, out of the blue, without advance notice.  Nice touch, Comcast!

As for the career-related aspect of this phenomenon, I’ve got two related thoughts to share.  For starters, the event that triggered me to think about this issue in the first place occurred when I stumbled across an article the other day called “How to Find A Job” that was published in the April edition of Money Magazine.  Have any of you seen this article?  If not, here’s the link that will take you there.  In fact, I’m not even sure “article” is the right word to describe this piece, because it’s actually more of a complete multi-media production than the more traditional type of print or web-based article most of us are familiar with.  Frankly, I was floored by how seamlessly this web piece integrates graphics, audio, and video to create a completely immersive reading/learning experience for the end-user — and the content is even housed in a familiar page-flipping interface, making it all the more comfortable!  So maybe I’m just really late to the party, and you’ve all seen this kind of thing before, but to me, this article-slash-website-slash-multimedia piece represents a whole new level of quality in terms of web-based communication — and if you click around on a bunch of the little videos and such, you’ll even find some halfway-decent career information contained in there…

So on one hand, I wanted to steer some of you to this site simply to marvel at the high-tech production value.  To me, after reviewing this site, it seems inevitable that this kind of integrated technology is going to continue transforming the way we share information and the ways in which companies, the media, and perhaps even (gasp!) government are able to communicate with their relative constituencies.  So if you, yourself, are in any type of field that relates to media, advertising, marketing, or a similar sector, I’d strongly suggest you stay up to speed in these emerging developments and make a point to acquire any relevant skills that you might need to maintain your marketability.  Which brings me to my second point.  The media and publishing world aside, what emerging developments and technologies are transforming your profession?  What are the things that may be on the “bleeding-edge” at the moment, but will be considered must-have qualifications a year or two from now?  What trends should you start tracking and throwing your arms around, lest you end up dangerously behind the curve during your next job transition?

I certainly recognize a number of forces (especially social media like Twitter, Facebook, etc.) that are becoming a greater and greater part of the job hunting process — and that I’ll need to familiarize with myself even more, in the near future, to maintain my credibility as a career coach.  So I’m challenging my fellow “frogs” out there to be on the lookout for similar important changes in your own professional arenas.  Remember, while these developments may be building only gradually right now, history suggests they’ll become a full-fledged tidal wave before you know it — and if haven’t kept up with them, your career prospects (and mine) are going to be at serious risk!

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2 Responses to “Change, Technology & Boiled Frogs”

  1. OK, I viewed the multi-media production of “How To Find A Job” and I honestly have to say I didn’t really discover anything new about the topic that hasn’t already been said billions of times in a plethora of ways (the phrase ‘reinventing the wheel’ comes to mind). In my opinion, the manual movie seemed like a new, somewhat innovative yet “over-the-top” spin of visual technology as a medium for sharing old information. I would have been FAR MORE IMPRESSED had I watched the same “show” and it had been a job seeker’s resume brought to life through animation. Now THAT would have been *ingenuity*!

  2. I agree. The Web site is an excellent example of good user experience design. My question, regarding my fellow frogs is: When and where is the cross over point? In other words, when will we ever know that we have finally chased enough technology in our work lives to be caught up, so to speak? At some point you need to stop and actually use the stuff long enough to go back for more. If technological change is now happening at a pace that is only 18 to 24 months out, a great many of us will soon be over educated boiled amphibians. Please advise.

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